Thursday, September 25, 2008

[IWS] Pew: NETWORKED WORKERS [Survey] Mixed Blessing [24 September 2008]

IWS Documented News Service
Institute for Workplace Studies----------------- Professor Samuel B. Bacharach
School of Industrial & Labor Relations
-------- Director, Institute for Workplace Studies
Cornell University
16 East 34th Street, 4th floor
---------------------- Stuart Basefsky
New York, NY 10016
-------------------------------Director, IWS News Bureau

Pew Internet & American Life Project

NETWORKED WORKERS : Most workers use the internet or email at their jobs, but they say these technologies are a mixed blessing for them [24 September 2008]
[full-text, 57 pages]


Press Release
Most Working Americans Now Use the Internet or Email at Their Jobs [24 September 2008]

Washington, DC - 09/24/2008 - A new national survey from the Pew Internet & American Life Project shows that 62% of adults who are currently employed use the internet or email at work and they have mixed views about the impact of technology on their work lives.

On the one hand, they cite the benefits of increased connectivity and flexibility that the internet and all of their various gadgets afford them at work. On the other hand, many workers say these tools have added stress and new demands to their lives.

This survey, "<> Networked Workers," also finds that 96% of those who work use the internet, email or have a cell phone for some purpose in their lives, even if those things are not specifically tied to work. We call this larger group "Wired and Ready Workers." When they are asked about the impact of these technologies on their work lives:

­ 80% say these technologies have improved their ability to do their job.
­ 73% say these technologies have improved their ability to share ideas with co-workers.
­ 58% say these tools have allowed them more flexibility in the hours they work.

At the same time, Wired and Ready Workers note various negative impacts of information and communications technologies on their work lives:

­ 49% say these technologies increase the level of stress in their job.
­ 49% say these technologies make it harder for them to disconnect from their work when they are at home and on the weekends.
­  46% say these tools increase demands that they work more hours.

This information is provided to subscribers, friends, faculty, students and alumni of the School of Industrial & Labor Relations (ILR). It is a service of the Institute for Workplace Studies (IWS) in New York City. Stuart Basefsky is responsible for the selection of the contents which is intended to keep researchers, companies, workers, and governments aware of the latest information related to ILR disciplines as it becomes available for the purposes of research, understanding and debate. The content does not reflect the opinions or positions of Cornell University, the School of Industrial & Labor Relations, or that of Mr. Basefsky and should not be construed as such. The service is unique in that it provides the original source documentation, via links, behind the news and research of the day. Use of the information provided is unrestricted. However, it is requested that users acknowledge that the information was found via the IWS Documented News Service.

Stuart Basefsky                   
Director, IWS News Bureau                
Institute for Workplace Studies 
Cornell/ILR School                        
16 E. 34th Street, 4th Floor             
New York, NY 10016                        
Telephone: (607) 255-2703                
Fax: (607) 255-9641                       

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